Posted on

The innovative baby evacuation device upgrading hospital evacuation plans around the world

Hospitals around the world are updating – and upgrading – their emergency evacuation plans with an innovative baby evacuation device which enables the safe and speedy rescue of up to six babies at a time. This may sound like hype, but consider this: with game-changing safety features which directly solve the problems with traditional infant evacuation devices, it’s no surprise that emergency planning committees are scrambling to make the switch. If you manage a nursery, NICU or SBCU as part of a hospital evacuation plan, you’ll want to know about the Evacu B baby evacuation device. Here’s why. A failsafeRead More
Posted on

The Rising Risks of Vertical Schools for Students and Teachers

Multi Story SchoolsWith the popularity of vertical schools in New Zealand on the rise, Evaculife Managing Director Bruce Bromley said schools are now needing to address the additional risks related to fire safety in multi-story structures more than ever before. The increase in vertical schools is a response to the growing demand for education in cities, with recent reports suggesting that Victoria will need an extra 220 schools by 2026. The first vertical school in Australia opened in 1976, however Victoria now has a handful of inner-city schools, with one opening in South Melbourne earlier this year. As an Accredited Disability AccessRead More
Posted on

Children and Fire: Essential Safety Information to Keep Them Safe

Children-Fire-FiremanEvery year, a significant number of house fires are started by curious children playing with lighters or matches. These fires cause damage, injuries and death, and the majority could be avoided. In this article, we’ll share some tips to help you understand why children light fires, explain why you must educate them and show you how to identify and remove potential risks in your home to keep your kids and your family safe. Keep Fire Out of Reach Always store lighters and matches well out of reach of children, preferably in a locked cabinet or cupboard up high. Never storeRead More
Posted on

Home Fire Safety Tips for High-Risk Groups

childing-hiding-under-a-bedWhen it comes to home fire safety, some groups and individuals have a higher risk of injury or death. Most vulnerable are children under five and adults aged 65 plus, as both are twice as likely to die in a residential fire than the general population. Other high-risk groups are people with disability including reduced mobility, cognitive impairment, hearing loss or blindness. If anyone in your home is in a high-risk group, it’s essential that your home fire escape plan includes the extra steps required to assist them in an emergency. Read on to learn some important tips to helpRead More
Posted on

How to Make an Effective Home Fire Escape Plan

Fire-Safety-PlanningIf a fire starts in your home it can spread rapidly, which is why the warning from your smoke alarm is critical to your survival. However, once a smoke alarm sounds you may only have one or two minutes to get out safely, so having an effective fire escape plan is also a must. Making a plan and ensuring your home is well prepared for a house fire doesn’t take much time or effort, and it can be the difference between life and death. To help you put your plan together, here are 7 simple steps to creating an effectiveRead More
Posted on

Get Down Low and Go, Go, Go

How to teach your kids to be fire safe, and get out safely if a house fire occurs. House fires in Australia are all too common – on average there are 3000 house fires every year in Victoria alone. If you have children, you must educate them on the risk of house fires, and practise your escape plan so they’ll know what to do if they are ever caught in a fire. Here’s some tips to help you get your family fire ready. Plan to Survive Every home should have a written fire escape plan, and you should share andRead More
Posted on

How to Have a Fire Safe Sleepover

What you need to know before you let your kids stay overnight Emergencies can happen any time – and when your children sleep over at a friend or relative’s house, as a parent you need to know that the home they are staying in is safe. With an average of 3000 house fires each year in Victoria, it’s essential that every home has basic fire safety measures in place. Before you agree to your child sleeping over, you need to know that if a fire was to happen overnight, the parents in charge have a well-drilled escape plan to helpRead More
Posted on

Safe Emergency Evacuation of Schools

With the holidays now over, and the anticipation of the school year ahead, it’s an exciting time for kids, parents and teachers alike. With every new year, there’s new challenges, and teachers have been busy planning – and this goes beyond just classes and the curriculum. Staff at all schools need to have plans in place to make sure that in the event of an emergency, everyone can get out safely. An evacuation in a school is particularly challenging – that’s why having an emergency evacuation plan that caters for everyone – including those with mobility limitations – is essential.Read More
Posted on

How to Safely Evacuate Children From Upper Floors

Why emergency evacuation ladders are a must-have for families in multi-storey dwellings Every home and workplace needs an evacuation plan – and if you live or work in a multi-storey building, you’ll also need to plan how occupants, including children, will escape if the usual exits are blocked. An emergency evacuation ladder provides an affordable and practical solution, transforming almost any upper-storey window into a portable fire escape. And importantly, they can be used to carry children and infants safely to the ground in the event of a fire. This makes them a potentially life-saving emergency tool – and oneRead More
Posted on

Emergency Management and Evacuation

General Requirements All buildings must develop, implement and adopt emergency plans to ensure a safe environment for employees, residents and visitors. When developing these plans the needs of people with disabilities must be considered. Ideally, all visitors should be able to independently evacuate from a level of a building, other than the entry level by way of an evacuation lift. However, it is acknowledged that buildings may not have been constructed to provide this level of accessibility in evacuation routes. Where a person might have difficulty negotiating an exit route (i.e. using a fire stairs), each building must implement someRead More